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Grafters X Change 2022 has ended

Grafters X Change had an apocalypse-responsive format in spring of 2022, offering online streaming content, scion exchanges on two consecutive Saturdays, an exchange of scions and seeds by mail, a publication, and other hybrid events.

February '22

All month:

Preparations

In February, we are gathering scionwood and cultivating ruderal rootstock, working on connecting resources across distributed nodes.
– If you are in a nearby watershed and have scionwood to share or are looking for a varietal or rootstock, fill out our online form: https://tinyurl.com/gxcform
– If you have information to share about local food forestry projects, or about related international grafting projects, we would love to feature your projects. We are accepting submissions of art projects, video documentation, talks that are tied to food forestry, guerrilla gardening, grafting, abolitionist landscapes, surviving and collective thriving in the Capitalocene. email info AT guerrillagrafters.org
– If you have questions about grafting, are excited about recent grafts, or want to tell us about how your food forest is going, call us at 1-888-GRRRAFT

March '22

All month:

Resource Share

Throughout March we invite our network to share what tree-related antics you are up to by calling our 800 number (1-888-GRRRAFT) and sharing images of your grafts through this form [BETA].

March 26

11:00-5:00: Scion wood and seed exchange (in person)

Scion and Seed exchange, workshops, and related eco-art events. in Schupf Garage Bay, adjacent to the Food Forest Studio in Hamilton Village. Full schedule found here.

Bring scion wood and seeds to share, or come for new varietals for the bioregion. Workshops on this day include the artists Environmental Performance Agency, Jack Magai of the More Trees Collective, and a workshop by DEC Forester Greg Owens. Hot Soup and coffee provided.

**Please note: participants are required to wear masks.

4:00-6:00: Haudenosaunee Relationships to Trees and their Role to Indigenous Food Sovereignty with Angela Ferguson (in person)

In the garage bay at Schupf Art Center. Join Angela Ferguson for a talk on Indigenous Food Sovereignty with a focus on the local trees of food forests, tree seeds and tree seed saving, as well as related considerations such as soil.

Angela is the current supervisor of the Onondaga Nation Farm. The farm practices all aspects of Food Sovereignty for their community. She is also one of the original organizing members of Braiding the Sacred, an all indigenous group of Traditional Corn Growers across Turtle Island. Her many passions include Haudenosaunee Traditional Agriculture, Seed Caring, Bee Keeping, Foraging, Traditional Cooking Methods, Knowledge Sharing, Haudenosaunee Nutrition Education, Youth Mentorship, & Traditional Hide Tanning.

6:30: A meal of tree foods (in person)

Join us for a traditional Haudenosaunee meal cooked by Angela after her talk. Sign-up for the meal here. There is limited space so sign-up soon!

Ferguson’s visit is generously supported by the Native American Studies Program as well as by the Institutes, Councils, Departments, and Programs listed below.

March 27

1:00-2:30: Tree Walk with DEC Forester Greg Owens and Artist Margaretha Haughwout (in person)

Leland Reserve, meet at Trailhead

Join us for an early spring tree walk and learn what wild trees can be grafted to transform your woods into a neighborhood food forest.

March 29

4:30-6:00p: Solitary Gardens with jackie sumell (hybrid)

part of the Art & Art History / Arts and Humanities Lecture series, held at Golden Auditorium on the Colgate campus, and on Zoom (register for Zoom event here).

jackie sumell is a prison abolitionist and multidisciplinary artist inspired by the lives of everyday people, working at the forefront of the public campaign to end isolation in the United States. sumell invites us to imagine a landscape without prisons. She has spent the last 2-decades working directly with incarcerated folx, most notably, her elders Herman Wallace and Albert Woodfox. Her work, anchored at the intersection of art, education, permaculture and social practice has been exhibited extensively throughout the U.S. and Europe. She has been the recipient of multiple residencies and fellowships including a 2021 Art Matters Fellowship, 2020 Art 4 Justice Fellowship, S.O.U.R.C.E. Fellowship, 2020 Creative Capital Grant, A Blade of Grass Fellowship, MSU’s Critical Race Studies Fellowship, Robert Rauschenberg Artist-as-Activist Fellowship, SorosJustice Fellowship, Eyebeam Project Fellowship and a Schloss Solitude Residency Fellowship. She received a B.S. from the College of Charleston, and M.F.A. from Stanford University.

sumell’s visit is generously supported by the Sylvia Ellins Fund for the Teaching and Learning of Diversity as well as by the Institutes, Councils, Departments, and Programs listed below.

March 30 – April 01

Streamed content (online)

Online. Full schedule found here

We will have streamed video and audio works tied to food forestry, guerrilla gardening, grafting, abolitionist landscapes, surviving and collective thriving in the Capitalocene. Artist, activist, ecologist and poet contributions include Radical Gardeners NYC, Roots Unbound, Seoidín O’Sullivan, Margaret Rhee, Samia Rahimtoola, Craig Santos, Lisa Wujnovich and Marta Lucia, the Environmental Performance Agency, Oliver Kellhammer, and many others. Check back for link and registration.

April 01

12:15-1:15p: Beyond Climate Justice with Jason W. Moore (hybrid)

part of the Colgate Environmental Studies Brown Bag,
held at the ALANA Cultural Center on the Colgate campus, and on Zoom (register for Zoom event here).

Jason W. Moore is an environmental historian and historical geographer at Binghamton University, where he is professor of sociology. He is author or editor, most recently, of Capitalism in the Web of Life (Verso, 2015), Capitalocene o Antropocene? (Ombre Corte, 2017), Anthropocene or Capitalocene? Nature, History, and the Crisis of Capitalism (PM Press, 2016), and, with Raj Patel, A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things (University of California Press, 2017). His books and essays on environmental history, capitalism, and social theory have been widely recognized, including the Alice Hamilton Prize of the American Society for Environmental History (2003), the Distinguished Scholarship Award of the Section on the Political Economy of the World-System (American Sociological Association, 2002 for articles, and 2015 for Web of Life), and the Byres and Bernstein Prize in Agrarian Change (2011). He coordinates the World-Ecology Research Network.

Jason W. Moore’s visit is supported by the Environmental Studies program, the Geography department, and Core Challenges of Modernity at Colgate University

3:30-5:00: Tree Walk with DEC Forester Greg Owens and Artist Margaretha Haughwout (in person)

Leland Reserve, meet at Trailhead

Join us for an early spring tree walk and learn what wild trees can be grafted to transform your woods into a neighborhood food forest

April 02

12:00-5:00: Scion wood and seed exchange (in person)

Scion and Seed exchange in Schupf Garage Bay, adjacent to the Food Forest Studio in Hamilton Village. Full schedule found here.

Bring scion wood and seeds to share, or come for new varietals for the bioregion. Workshops on this day include a grafting workshop by Oliver Kellhammer and an Abolitonist’s Tea party with jackie sumell. Hot Soup and coffee provided.

**Please note: participants are required to wear masks.

12:00-1:30: Abolitionist’s Tea Party with jackie sumell (in person)

Historically, plants are part of the resistance, communicating freedom and liberation. Plants, as healers and storytellers were used to map significant places along the underground railroad. Okra (ngombo), whose seeds were braided into the hair of the enslaved as they struggled to survive the abhorrent middle passage were then planted into colonized soil. The bright yellow ngombo flowers became beacons of hope to other enslaved individuals. It is said that enslaved people could remember their homeland through the flowers that waved to them on foreign soil. 
 
An Abolitionist’s Tea Party will ask; How does the natural world endorse abolition as a strategy for liberation? If we accept abolition as a commitment to ending cycles of harm, we can begin to see all the ways the natural world informs the tenets of human abolition. From the gardens we learn profound lessons in patience, interdependence, care and mutual aid. We learn about different relationships and boundaries. Abolition, like growing a plant, requires daily attention and care. Love, hope, compassion, social equity- like a garden-need time, patience, practice and nurturing to fully blossom. 

 

 

Grafters X Change is generously supported by the Colgate Arts Council and the Upstate Institute, as well as by the as well as by the Sylvia Ellins Fund for the Teaching and Learning of Diversity; the Departments of Art & Art History, Geography, and Sociology and Anthropology; the Native American Studies, Environmental Studies, Educational Studies Programs; Core Challenges of Modernity; and the Divisions of Arts and Humanities, University Studies, and Natural Sciences and Mathematics at Colgate.

GXC partners include the Southern Madison Heritage Trust and the Village of Hamilton Tree Commission.