Grafters X Change 2022

Grafters X Change will have an apocalypse-responsive format in spring of 2022, offering online streaming content, a one-day in-person exchange, an exchange of scions and seeds by mail, a publication, and other hybrid events.
Grafters X Change 2022

Grafters X Change will have an apocalypse-responsive format in spring of 2022, offering online streaming content, a one-day in-person exchange, an exchange of scions and seeds by mail, a publication, and other hybrid events.

February '22

All month:

Preparations

In February, we are gathering scionwood and cultivating ruderal rootstock, working on connecting resources across distributed nodes.
– If you are in a nearby watershed and have scionwood to share or are looking for a varietal or rootstock, email info AT guerrillagrafters.org
– If you have information to share about local food forestry projects, or about related international grafting projects, we would love to feature your projects. We are accepting submissions of art projects, video documentation, talks that are tied to food forestry, guerrilla gardening, grafting, abolitionist landscapes, surviving and thriving in the Capitalocene. email info AT guerrillagrafters.org
– If you have questions about grafting, are excited about recent grafts, or want to tell us about how your food forest is going, call us at 1-888-GRRRAFT

March '22

All month:

Resource Share

Throughout March we invite our network to share what tree-related antics you are up to by calling our 800 number (1-888-GRRRAFT) and sharing images of your grafts through this form [BETA].

March 26 and April 02, 11:00-5:00:

Scion wood and seed exchange

Scion and Seed exchange in Schupf Garage Bay, adjacent to the Food Forest Studio in Hamilton Village

Bring scion wood and seeds to share, or come for new varietals for the bioregion. Hot Soup and coffee provided.

March 29, 4:30-6:00p:

Abolitionist Landscapes with jackie sumell

part of the Art & Art History / Arts and Humanities Lecture series, held at Golden Auditorium on the Colgate campus, and on Zoom.

jackie sumell is a prison abolitionist and multidisciplinary artist inspired by the lives of everyday people, working at the forefront of the public campaign to end isolation in the United States. sumell invites us to imagine a landscape without prisons. She has spent the last 2-decades working directly with incarcerated folx, most notably, her elders Herman Wallace and Albert Woodfox. Her work, anchored at the intersection of art, education, permaculture and social practice has been exhibited extensively throughout the U.S. and Europe. She has been the recipient of multiple residencies and fellowships including a 2021 Art Matters Fellowship, 2020 Art 4 Justice Fellowship, S.O.U.R.C.E. Fellowship, 2020 Creative Capital Grant, A Blade of Grass Fellowship, MSU’s Critical Race Studies Fellowship, Robert Rauschenberg Artist-as-Activist Fellowship, SorosJustice Fellowship, Eyebeam Project Fellowship and a Schloss Solitude Residency Fellowship. She received a B.S. from the College of Charleston, and M.F.A. from Stanford University.

March 30 – April 02

Streamed content

online

We will have streamed video and audio works tied to food forestry, guerrilla gardening, grafting, abolitionist landscapes, and surviving and thriving in the Capitalocene. Check back for details.

April 01, 12:15-1:15p:

Lecture by Environmental Historian Jason W. Moore

part of the Colgate Environmental Studies Brown Bag,
held at ALANA on the Colgate campus, and on Zoom.

Jason W. Moore is an environmental historian and historical geographer at Binghamton University, where he is professor of sociology. He is author or editor, most recently, of Capitalism in the Web of Life (Verso, 2015), Capitalocene o Antropocene? (Ombre Corte, 2017), Anthropocene or Capitalocene? Nature, History, and the Crisis of Capitalism (PM Press, 2016), and, with Raj Patel, A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things (University of California Press, 2017). His books and essays on environmental history, capitalism, and social theory have been widely recognized, including the Alice Hamilton Prize of the American Society for Environmental History (2003), the Distinguished Scholarship Award of the Section on the Political Economy of the World-System (American Sociological Association, 2002 for articles, and 2015 for Web of Life), and the Byres and Bernstein Prize in Agrarian Change (2011). He coordinates the World-Ecology Research Network.

Jason W. Moore’s visit is supported by the Environmental Studies program, the Geography department, and Core Challenges of Modernity at Colgate University

Full schedule coming soon — check back as content is added

 

 

Grafters X Change is generously supported by the Colgate Arts Council and the Upstate Institute, as well as by the departments of Art & Art History, Environmental Studies, Geography, Educational Studies, Core Challenges of Modernity, and the Divisions of Arts and Humanities, University Studies, Natural Sciences at Colgate.